SECURING HABITAT

As competition for land in Africa increases, we work to keep wildlife landscapes safe from encroaching development and degradation. Our science and research identify critical wildlife corridors and habitats so they can be safeguarded. We work with investors and donors to create wildlife-based economies that protect wildlife and landscapes while ensuring that conservation provides economic value to local communities by creating jobs, sharing grazing lands, and expanding national economies.

WHERE DO WE DO THIS?

Angola Botswana GABON KENYA Namibia UGANDA Zambia Zimbabwe

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CONSERVATION DIVIDENDS

'Conservation' has for some time been misunderstood as an exercise in keeping land wild for animals and not for people. We couldn't disagree more: conservation as we practice it is all about bringing long-term, sustained rewards from looking after environments and their wild animals to people, governments, and the planet. Locally, businesses like solar farms give back to their neighbours. Wilderness ecotourism creates jobs and funds social projects like schools or clinics, while new business buys from nearby suppliers. Nationally, successful enterprise drives growth and pays taxes. Underpinning all our activities is the idea that conservation must bring tangible value.

LANDSCAPE TRANSACTIONS

We work with community land owners, private properties, and protected areas to identify new investors and to direct fresh ways to finance conservation. An example is Loisaba Conservancy, a 56,000-acre refuge for elephants in Kenya’s Laikipia region. With The Nature Conservancy, we helped find finance for a Kenyan community trust to buy the property. We now help that trust manage the conservancy and funnel funding from ecotourism and other business to protecting wildlife and bringing benefits, including 350 jobs, education, and health services, to local people.

Visit Loisaba
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MT KENYA ABERDARE CORRIDOR

WILDLIFE CORRIDORS

Once open, today endless landscapes are increasingly being fenced and partitioned as development restricts animals' traditional migration routes. For many species, but for elephants especially, that could be fatal: they must move to survive. Their ecosystems, especially equatorial forests, only thrive when elephants move through them, spreading seeds. We aim for landscapes to be connected and contiguous, and work to keep critical 'corridors' open so wildlife can move with the seasons to find food and forage.

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